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From bozemandailychronicle.com

The day the wolves arrived in Yellowstone National Park was busy. At least that’s how Norm Bishop remembers it.

The wolves came in aluminum crates on horse trailers Jan. 12, 1995. Passing through the gates, the Canadian-born carnivores were the first of their kind in the park in decades, other than the occasional rumor or random sighting.

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From winnipegfreepress.com

Rick McIntyre took a job not to keep the wolf from the door, but to make sure he was always there when it came calling.

This elderly American is a celebrated world expert on one of earth’s pre-eminent predators, and has spent more time watching wolves than anyone on Earth.

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From mountainjournal.org

Park Service veteran Norm Bishop tried to prepare the Yellowstone region for wolves. Today he reflects on what we’ve learned

Wildlife lovers are celebrating an anniversary: Twenty-five years ago in January 1995, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Park Service translocated 14 gray wolves from Alberta to Yellowstone and 15 to central Idaho to restore them to those areas. In 1996, another 17 wolves from British Columbia were moved to Yellowstone, and 20 to central Idaho.

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From nbcmontana.com

A pair of Yellowstone National Park wolf pups were fatally hit by a vehicle after the animals became used to humans and started hanging around a road near their den.

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From www.nationalgeographic.com:

In 2012, “the most famous wolf in the world” was shot by a trophy hunter outside the sanctuary of Yellowstone National Park. She was known as ’06, and her death caused an international outcry comparable to the killing of Cecil the Lion in 2015. It also led to a new awareness of the plight of wolves and demands for greater protection, as Nate Blakeslee explains in his new book American Wolf. [Find out why wolves are so polarizing.]

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From Bozeman Daily Chronicle:

Investigators are still looking into the shooting of a Yellowstone wolf earlier this year, and park officials this week renewed their call for tips.

Yellowstone National Park posted a video to its Facebook page Thursday of biologist Doug Smith talking about the white wolf, which was the alpha female of the Canyon Pack. The post said investigators are still looking for information about its shooting.

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From KCET:

The damage Chad McKittrick has done to America’s endangered species might finally be coming to an end.

In March, 1995, 14 gray wolves from Canada were released in Yellowstone National Park, part of an attempt to reintroduce the species to the area. Biologists working the project were especially fond of one wolf in particular. He was a big, medium-gray male, “Wolf #10,” added to the reintroduction group as a mate for a single black female, “Wolf #9.” The largest of the wolves in what biologists hoped would become the Rose Creek Pack, #10 seemed destined to make history.

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