From the Madras Pioneer:

Oregon wildlife officials said Tuesday they have identified a new family of wolves in the northern Cascade Mountains, bringing the total number of known wolf groups in the region to three.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife confirmed the new family of wolves with two adults and two pups. They were discovered in December on the reservation of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, about 100 miles southeast of Portland.

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From the Adirondack Explorer:

A Princeton University DNA examination found a canid killed by a hunter in December near Cooperstown was a gray wolf, and the state Department of Environmental Conservation is now confirming that analysis.

Both DEC and wildlife advocates received lab results on Tuesday.

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From IndiaToday.in:

For the first time ever, a wild arctic wolf was successfully cloned by a China-based gene firm. The firm, Sinogene Biotechnology, released a video of Maya, the world’s first cloned wild arctic wolf, 100 days after her birth in a Beijing lab.

Maya, the first ever cloned wild arctic wolf, is 100 days old and is in good health, the Global Times reported. Maya’s donor cell came from the skin sample of a wild female arctic wolf. Its oocyte was from a female dog and its surrogate mother was a beagle, the report said.

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From DiscoverMagazine.com:

Wolves have lived in the area that is now Yellowstone National Park in the U.S. for over 300,000 years. But there was a time — between about 1930 and 1995 — when no wolves walked the park.

In the early part of the 20th century, wolves were considered dangerous animals, with no benefit to the world. Even conservationists thought wolves were bad news. In fact, the lauded conservationist-president Teddy Roosevelt, who created the U.S. Forest Service, once called wolves “beasts of waste and desolation.” (He later softened his views on wolves and other big predators as he learned more about ecology.)

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From WhiskeyRiff.com:

Wolves man… watching them hunt is an incredible experience.

Unfortunately for this pup, he was on the wrong side of it.

Filmed in Italy, by Pablo Forconi, we can see the moment this pack of wolves snap into action. Calculated, precise… the leader gives the signal and they go charging forward, a three-headed nightmare for this poor doggo.

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From Grand View Outdoors:

How do elk respond when an apex predator, once eliminated from the landscape, stages a comeback? Researchers in New Mexico are keen to find out. They are taking a deep look at how southwestern elk herds may be changing their habits as populations of a native predator, the Mexican gray wolf, grow. Currently three years into a four-year study, researchers aim to document elk population dynamics and how they respond to wolves on the landscape. A collaboration between the New Mexico Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at New Mexico State University (NMSU), Arizona Game and Fish DepartmentNew Mexico Department of Game and Fish and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the study kicked off in early 2019, led by principal investigator James Cain.

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From Clearwater Times in Clearwater, B.C.:

Sixty-six wolves were culled in the Itcha-Ilgachuz caribou range in the first months of 2022 with more expected to be removed in the coming winter, confirmed the Ministry of Land, Water and Resource Stewardship.

The provincial government has been doing wolf culls since 2015 as part of an effort to restore caribou herds.

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From The Guardian in the UK:

The sighting of a new family of gray wolves in Oregon’s Cascade mountains has given wildlife advocates hope that the recovery of the endangered species in the state is gathering pace.

The state’s fish and wildlife department (ODFW) said a group of two adults and two pups was captured by a trail camera in August.

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From USNews.com and the Associated Press:

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon wildlife officials said Tuesday they have identified a new family of wolves in the northern Cascade Mountains, bringing the total number of known wolf groups in the region to three.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife confirmed the new family of wolves with two adults and two pups. They were discovered in December on the reservation of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, about 100 miles (160 kilometers) southeast of Portland.

Click here for the full story.

From Minnesota Public Radio:

Researchers in far northern Minnesota are concerned about a young wolf south of Voyageurs National Park that’s been seen several times along a roadside, displaying little to no fear of people.

Scientists with the Voyageurs Wolf Project posted photos of the wolf on their Facebook page Tuesday, asking the public to share details about their encounters with the wolf and imploring people to leave it alone.

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