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From the Washington Post:

Ron Sutherland isn’t much of a football fan, but he has an interest in what Washington’s NFL team chooses as a replacement for its soon-to-be-retired “Redskins” name. The franchise’s decision could affect the future of an endangered species he’s spent a decade of his career studying.

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From SouthernEnvironment.org:

The birth of seven red wolf pups at the North Carolina Zoo symbolizes hope for the world’s only wild red wolf population, teetering once again on the brink of extinction.

America’s red wolves came howling back from extinction in the wild in 1980 after successful conservation efforts and reintroductions from captive populations—like these pups—to number around 100 wild wolves for approximately a decade in eastern North Carolina.

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From North Carolina State University:

A new study from North Carolina State University suggests that people have more tolerance for wolves after seeing positive videos about them, which could make YouTube an important wolf conservation tool.

“One of the cool things about these results is that positive messaging was effective for changing people’s views. People had more positive attitudes, greater willingness to accept wolves, and were more likely to take action to help their conservation – no matter their political identity or their age – after watching positive videos,” said Nils Peterson, senior author of the study and a professor in NC State’s Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources.

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From The Courier-Tribune:

ASHEBORO — A zoo in North Carolina has announced the birth of five American red wolves.

The animals are critically endangered. There are only 15 to 20 red wolves still believed to be in the wild in eastern North Carolina.

The North Carolina Zoo in Asheboro announced the births in a statement on Friday. The five pups were born as part of its American red wolf breeding program.

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From Coastal Review Online:

COLUMBIA — As the number of known red wolves roaming in the wilds of northeastern North Carolina has dwindled to a mere dozen, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it is taking steps to increase the wild population while methodically making progress on its revised management plan for the critically endangered species.

On the heels of an uproar from wolf supporters about the agency’s proposal to drastically decrease the wolf’s recovery area, a federal judge’s ruling on Nov. 5, 2018, agreed with a challenge from environmental groups that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was not abiding by its legal requirement to properly protect the red wolves.

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From The News-Observer

Joe Madison, hands in his pockets, eyes the fresh tracks in the sand with keen interest.

“They may have been here since this morning,” he says.

The intern beside him lifts a pronged antenna above her head and turns it left and right. A radio receiver, cabled to the antenna and looped over her shoulder, crackles with static. She listens, turns some knobs on the receiver, and carefully rotates the antenna. Then, she stops.

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From thecoastlandtimes.com

The fight over the critically endangered red wolf has returned to court as North Carolina’s governor sought immediate help for the dozen or so remaining in the wild and federal biologists planned to transfer wolves into the recovery area for the first time in years.

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From dailypress.com

Survival of a rare wolf species in North Carolina could depend on how well a male and female from a Florida island get along.

Puppies are needed.

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