From MPRNews.org:

A federal judge on Friday scheduled a hearing for later this month on whether to block Wisconsin’s fall wolf hunt.

Six Chippewa tribes filed a lawsuit in the Western District of Wisconsin on Sept. 21 seeking to stop the hunt, saying hunters killed too many wolves during the state’s February season and the kill limit for the fall hunt isn’t based on science.

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From EarthJustice.org:

MADISON, WI — Earthjustice is back in court today on behalf of six Ojibwe tribes seeking a preliminary injunction to stop Wisconsin from holding a wolf hunt in November. The motion asks the judge to hold a hearing before the planned hunt slated to begin on Nov. 6.

This motion is part of the tribes’ lawsuit filed Sept. 21  in the Western District of Wisconsin against the state claiming the proposed hunt violates the tribes’ treaty rights.

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From the Idaho Mountain Express:

The targeted killings of 15 wolves in the mountains surrounding the Wood River Valley this summer as part of three federal depredation operations has raised a number of questions from Idaho State Rep. Muffy Davis, D-Ketchum, and Blaine County Commissioner Dick Fosbury.

Employees with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services destroyed two wolf packs in Blaine County plus killed a single wolf between July 4 and Sept. 16, according to records provided by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

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From The Brussels Times in Belgium:

Another Shetland pony has been killed by a wolf in Belgium, not long after around 3,000 people took part in a torchlit parade to protest the presence of wolves running wild in the Flemish countryside.

The pony was mauled to death in Oudsbergen, a municipality in the Belgian province of Limburg, according to the Flemish infocentre for agriculture and horticulture (VILT).

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From KBJR6.com:

ELY, MN– The International Wolf Center is investing in the next generation of wildlife biologists.

As an investment in the future of wolf research and science-based wolf education, the Center will award two fellowships in the spring of 2022.

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From the Missoula Current:

With the wolf body count mounting, more people are calling either for Montana to moderate its hunting and trapping or for the federal government to step in.

As of Thursday, 11 wolves have died since the rifle season for wolves opened on Sept. 15, and the archery season opened on Sept. 5. More may have been killed over the past four days, but the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks wolf harvest status page, which is supposed to be updated daily, hadn’t been updated as of 4 p.m. Monday afternoon.

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From MontanaRightNow.com:

MAMMOTH HOT SPRINGS, Wyo. – Three Yellowstone National Park wolves were killed by Montana hunters during the first week of the state’s wolf hunting season, YNP wolf biologists report.

The park’s Junction Butte Pack, which is the most viewed wolf pack in the world, lost three of its 27 wolves. The death of two female pups and one female yearling was confirmed by multiple overflights conducted by the park.

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From the Laramie Boomerang in Wyoming:

JACKSON — The way Lane Bunner tells it, the wolf was chasing his Jack Russell terrier, had closed to within 40 yards or so, and he had to make a split-second decision.

It was a sunny Thursday morning in late September 2017, and the Casper man, then 53 years old, said he interrupted saddling horses and getting ready for a day of elk hunting in the Leidy Highlands. He fetched his rifle, fired, and the hefty young gray-coated canine that ran with the Phantom Springs Pack fell.

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From The Times in the UK:

The Spanish government has made an extraordinary mistake by banning wolf hunting, politicians in the north of the country said. They vowed to fight the new law and warned that wolves would swarm through villages.

Until last week wolves could be hunted north of the Duero river in the autonomous communities of Castile and León, Galicia, Asturias and Cantabria, where 95 per cent of Iberian wolves are concentrated. There are between 2,000 and 2,500 wolves in Spain. Wolf hunting is now a crime punishable with up to two years’ imprisonment.

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From the Casper Star Tribune in Wyoming:

For nearly half a century, some of Wyoming’s biggest trophies prowled just out of hunters’ reach.

The state has tried to buck federal constraints on hunting. But aside from a few short-lived victories and a recent win on wolves, its grizzly bears and gray wolves remained firmly in the custody of the U.S. government, shielded by the stringent terms of the Endangered Species Act.

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