From BBC.co.UK:

Wildlife experts in Belgium are getting excited to welcome the country’s first set of wild wolf cubs in more than 100 years.

Adult wolves were spotted in 2018 in the European country for the first time in over one hundred years, and experts have been keeping a close eye on them and hoping for babies.

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From MPR.org:

For the past several years, University of Minnesota researchers have studied wolves in Voyageurs National Park to learn how they spend their summers.

They’ve uncovered some fascinating details. Wolves are often thought of as bloodthirsty carnivores that hunt large mammals. But in the summers, the researchers tracked them catching freshwater fish — and even feasting on wild blueberries.

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From The Brussels Times:

Wolves will be given the highest degree of protection in Flanders, which means that killing one deliberately can be punished by fines up to €500,000.

The preliminary draft decree, based on the proposal by Flemish Minister for Environment Zuhal Demir, was approved in principle by the Flemish government, reports De Morgen.

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From Undark.org:

WHEN THE YOUNG David Mech was offered a job studying wolves in 1957, people asked him why he’d want to focus on such an evil creature. A loathing for wolves was commonplace back then, and after decades of hunting, trapping, and poisoning, humanity had succeeded in wiping out these keystone predators — perched at the top of the North American food chain for thousands of years — across much of the contiguous U.S. “Sixty years ago, when I started,” he remembers, “I had to explain what the word ‘ecology’ meant.”

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From DutchNews.nl:

Four highland cattle calves roaming on a nature reserve near the Brabant village of Someren appear to have been killed by wolves, experts say. The four calves, all around one year old and weighing between 80 and 100 kilos, have all been killed on the Kievitsloop reserve in the last three weeks. They appear to have been taken by the throat, after which their organs have been eaten, a method of killing which experts say is the typical work of a wolf.

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From The Guardian:

Belgium is becoming “the wolf crossroads of Europe”, a conservation charity has said as it reported new sightings from France and Germany, while Flemish authorities separately announced the imminent arrival of wolf puppies.

Flanders’ environment minister, Zuhal Demir, announced that a pair of wolves in the north of the country were expecting cubs, four months after arrival in the area of a female wolf, Noëlla, who was billed as “a potential new love” for a previously lone wolf, August.

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From the Payson Roundup:

What’s in a word?

Like “essential.”

Quite a bit, as it turns out.

So the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is once again seeking public comment on another interesting wrinkle in the 40-year effort to return Mexican wolves to the wild in Arizona and New Mexico.

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From the International Falls Journal:

The Voyageurs National Park Wolf Project is in jeopardy should the Minnesota Senate follow through with the idea it will not pursue an bill allocating money from the state’s Environment and Natural Resource Trust Fund as recommended by the Legislative Citizens Commission on Minnesota Resources.

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From The Daily Chronicle in Washington state:

Washington’s annual wolf report, released Monday, was a mixed bag, according to regional conservation groups.

The good news? Wolf populations continue to grow in Washington. The bad? Most wolves remain concentrated in northeast Washington, a geographic reality that, per the state’s rules, stymies the recovery process.

“I think we’re anxious to see more growth in the North Cascades and even getting our first wolf pack south of 1-90,” said Paula Sweeden, Conservation Northwest’s policy director. “That’s an important indicator for getting toward recovery.”

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From The Narwhal:

Wolves have long been a source of fascination for biologist Kevin Van Tighem, who grew up in southern Alberta in the 1960s and 1970s. He read widely about the exotic creature he had never seen, an animal often hated and feared: depicted in a popular fairy tale as a big-toothed, big-eyed monster whose trickery would soon be rewarded with a pleasant meal.

Van Tighem’s first personal encounter with a wolf — unexpectedly hearing one howl near his home in Banff — helped launch him on a lifelong journey to understand our complicated relationship with the shaggy canid whose ancestors branched off millions of years ago in the tree of evolution, eventually to gift humans with our most loyal companions: dogs.

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