From News10.com in New York:

ALBANY, N.Y. (WTEN) — A DNA test has confirmed that an animal shot in the Greater Capital Region last December was a gray wolf. While data has shown that some coyotes in the northeast are part-wolf, the DNA of the 85-pound animal killed in Central New York was 99% wolf—a mixture of Great Lakes, Northwest Territories, and eastern gray wolf, according to the results of a DNA test released Tuesday.

Joseph Butera, a member of the Northeast Ecological Recovery Society, a not-for-profit that advocates for the restoration of native species in the Northeast, coordinated the DNA test after he saw the wolf on a hunter’s Facebook page. The hunter agreed to supply a tissue sample, which was tested by a lab at Trent University in Ohio.

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From ThatOregonLife.com:

After federal protection for gray wolves in Western Oregon was restored earlier this year, wildlife biologists are interested to see groups of wolves like the ones caught on this photo by trail camera roaming in Western Oregon.

In July of 2022, near the Klamath and Deschutes county line, a trail camera captured a cute family photo of an adult wolf and five adorable wolf pups.

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From the Summit Daily in Colorado:

State leaders gathered Friday, July 22, to discuss the next steps of relocating wolves back to Colorado, and this time, funding and management were on the table.

Keystone Policy Center has been facilitating the process as a third-party, collaborating with a stakeholder advisory group and a technical working group. Julie Shapiro, natural resources center director for Keystone Policy Center, said that the stakeholder group had come to a consensus on three potential funding sources for the reintroduction.

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From Central Oregon Daily News:

A wildlife trail camera in the Upper Deschutes wildlife management area caught an image of a wolf and five wolf pups roaming earlier this month. That’s part of the reason the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) is now designating a new Area of Known Wolf Activity (AKWA) for that area in Klamath and Deschutes counties.

The image of the wolf family was captured July 4. ODFW said the discovery confirmed suspicious that a new group of wolves had taken up residency.

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From the Minnesota Reformer:

Wolf attacks on livestock boost the electoral fortunes of candidates of far-right political parties, according to a new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The study analyzed data from Germany, where wolves have been reintroduced in recent decades following their eradication in the 20th century. Wolf attacks on livestock, which were virtually unheard of prior to 2000, now occur hundreds of times per year.

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From The Durango Herald:

A group of wildlife advocates is blasting Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s wolf reintroduction process, saying the intent of the voter-approved proposition has been “lost or undermined.”

Since voters in November 2020 approved Proposition 114 directing the state to craft a plan and reintroduce wolves on the Western Slope by the end of 2023, CPW has hosted a series of statewide meetings and organized two groups to create a management plan.

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From DH News:

“The war on wolves continues.”

That’s what the conservation group Pacific Wild says after the Supreme Court of British Columbia denied its application to end the wolf cull.

The BC government began the cull in 2015 to save endangered woodland caribou, and has seen at least 1,400 wolves killed through the aerial wolf reduction program since then, according to FOI documents obtained by Pacific Wild.

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From the Colorado Sun:

A group of wildlife advocates is blasting Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s wolf reintroduction process, saying the intent of the voter-approved proposition has been “lost or undermined.”

Since voters in November 2020 approved Proposition 114 directing the state to craft a plan and reintroduce wolves on the Western Slope by the end of 2023, CPW has hosted a series of statewide meetings and organized two groups to create a management plan.

Click here for the full story.

From Science Alert:

Studying the sleep patterns of wolves in comparison to dogs can give us an insight into how evolution and domestication may have affected sleep – and that’s exactly the point of a new study.

The study involved seven hand-raised, socialized wolves, which meant that they could be calmly and safely coaxed into natural sleep by their handlers without any risk of agitating or harming the animals.

Researchers then used non-invasive electrode measurements via an electroencephalogram, or EEG, to track brain activity as each wolf snoozed.

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From the Arizona Daily Sun and the Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — U.S. wildlife managers are being sued over their new management rule for the endangered Mexican gray wolf, with a coalition of environmentalists saying the recently adopted court-ordered changes fail to address genetic concerns and limit the predators from roaming bigger swaths of the American Southwest.

The rule, released before a July 1 deadline, was the result of another years-long legal battle over the predators. Among other things, it outlines when and how wolves can be removed from the wild or released from captivity.

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