From SierraClub.org:

A stream slices through the high desert of western Colorado. It swells with clear, cold spring runoff. Willows and aspen necklace the banks, their baby green leaves pointing to the sun. An elk stops to drink, then clambers away at the sound of rustling in the sagebrush.

This is a landscape shaped, in part, by wolves. Right now it’s only a hope for the future, but it could become reality if Coloradans pass Initiative 107, a November ballot measure to reintroduce gray wolves west of the Continental Divide.

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From RTL Today:

Three sheep were found dead in Niederanven on 27 April, showing signs of a predator attack. DNA analysis now confirmed that the sheep fell prey to a wolf.

The Ministry of the Environment confirmed earlier this Wednesday that the sheep were in fact killed by a wolf. The Senckenberg institute in Gelnhausen, Germany, came to the conclusion after analysing DNA samples.

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From The Courier-Tribune:

ASHEBORO — A zoo in North Carolina has announced the birth of five American red wolves.

The animals are critically endangered. There are only 15 to 20 red wolves still believed to be in the wild in eastern North Carolina.

The North Carolina Zoo in Asheboro announced the births in a statement on Friday. The five pups were born as part of its American red wolf breeding program.

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From CKLB radio in Canada’s Northwest Territory:

The territorial government has awarded a second contract to continue shooting wolves from the air, this one worth $100,000.

The second contract, like the first, was awarded to Great Slave Helicopters, according to Open NWT. Combined, the contracts are worth $191,000 for about three weeks of aerial removal.

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From the Idaho Statesman:

On Thursday, the Idaho Fish and Game Commission will decide on a petition that would require trappers to post signs warning of active traps nearby — a move that the petitioners say would save dogs from being caught in traps, and which trappers say would expose their trap lines to tampering.

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From The New Indian Express:

BENGALURU: Here is some good news for wildlife conservation in these difficult times. The Indian grey wolf has been sighted and recorded for the first time in Chamarajanagara district. A Schedule-1 Species under WPA 1972, the grey wolf is also listed as an endangered species in Appendix-1 of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).

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From The Telegraph in the UK:

An ancient breed of sheepdog is being recruited to protect livestock as part of a campaign to encourage the return of wolves to the mountains of Portugal.

Dozens of Serra de Estrela mountain dog puppies are to be trained as sheepdogs to help farmers ward off attacks from wolves, as the species makes a comeback.

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From UPI.com:

DENVER, May 8 (UPI) — As the population of gray wolves expands across the northern United States, researchers are finding a surprising side-effect: Their presence appears to lead to a reduction in the coyote population.

Wildlife researchers at the University of Washington are using radio transmitter collars and game cameras to determine how the new presence of top-of-the-food-chain predators is influencing scavengers, or “kleptoparasites,” particularly coyotes.

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From The Durango Herald:

FARMINGTON – A wildlife activist group has filed Freedom of Information Act requests in hopes of understanding why federal agencies killed four Mexican gray wolves in New Mexico.

The Center for Biological Diversity said it is trying to determine if the state’s livestock industry swayed the agencies’ decision to kill the animals.

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From the Roswell Daily Record:

Chaves County is preparing to go another round with a federal agency about the Mexican wolf.

County Manager Stanton Riggs said the county intends to partner with other counties before signing a memorandum of understanding sent by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that governs how the agency will develop a new rule about establishing experimental populations of the species in New Mexico and Arizona.

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