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From KUNC.org:

Dan Thompson says he has seen wolves at their best, and their worst.

As the big carnivore supervisor for Wyoming Fish and Game, Thompson has gotten to step within a few feet of a wolf after biologists prepared to tranquilize the animal in a trap.

“Just to see that yellow in the eyes and that little bark and howl, I mean, it kind of penetrates your soul quite honestly,” Thompson said last month from his home in Lander, Wyoming.

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From The Torrington Telegram:

PINEDALE — As gray wolves keep pushing through the edges of Wyoming’s trophy game management area, the federal agency Wildlife Services responds to requests from Wyoming Game and Fish to manage their predations. 

“Game and Fish manages the trophy game area and handles livestock predations,” said Wildlife Service-Wyoming Manager Mike Foster. “We work for Game and Fish.” 

A helicopter was seen reportedly carrying one large wolf slung underneath as it flew to the Dell Creek elk winter feedground last week. 

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From KGAB radio:

New video shows two of the most prolific predators in Yellowstone. It’s a pack of wolves and a grizzly trying to determine who ends up with a prize carcass.

Taylor Bland must have a knack for being at the right place at the right time. She has captured multiple wolf and bear encounters and shared them on Instagram. This is the newest video showing a wolf pack and a not very happy grizzly.

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From Gizmodo:

Twenty-five years ago, wildlife managers in Yellowstone National Park undertook one of the most consequential actions in modern American conservation when they unleashed 14 wolves into the park.

The program to reintroduce wolves to Yellowstone in 1995 has since seen wolf packs fan out across one of the largest intact ecosystems in the Lower 48. Reintroducing an apex predator that humans wiped out earlier in the century has had consequences both intended and unintended. It was—and continues to be—wildly controversial but also 100% right. Ecosystems have flourished under a newly found balance; tourists have come to catch a glimpse of animals no longer found in many other states; and scientists have had a chance to observe an unprecedented experiment in rewilding.

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From ScienceNews.org:

Wildlife ecologist Jim Halfpenny was standing by the stone arch at the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park on January 12, 1995, when horse trailers eased through carrying the first wild gray wolves to enter the park in about 60 years. Delivered from Canada, these wolves were the beginning of a historic attempt to complete and restore the park’s ecosystem by reintroducing a species wiped out decades before (SN: 3/17/19).

He remembers that the schoolchildren who had gathered were disappointed to see only trailers, with not even a glimpse of fur. However, Halfpenny and the other elated adults “were up there howling our heads off,” he says.

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From National Geographic:

Twenty-five years after gray wolves returned to Yellowstone National Park, the predators that some feared would wipe out elk have instead proved to be more of a stabilizing force. New research shows that by reducing populations and thinning out weak and sick animals, wolves are helping create more resilient elk herds.

For the past 12 years, elk numbers in the park’s largest herd have leveled off between about 6,000 and 8,000, instead of extreme boom-and-bust cycles due to climate fluctuations.

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From The Torrington Telegram:

JACKSON — Biologists have had a microscope on the Gros Ventre River drainage for a couple winters now, monitoring how the region’s apex canine carnivores are interacting with their most locally abundant ungulate prey — elk.

Insights are amassing.

Wolves aren’t killing off the elk herd in the broad basin east of Jackson Hole. In fact, none of the dozens of cow elk that have been fitted with GPS collars in the research project have succumbed to wolf predation.

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From the Billings Gazette and the Associated Press:

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — Russ Lucas first noticed in mid-April that an unwelcome neighbor — wolves — were back on his family’s Spring Gulch cattle ranch.

The hindquarter of a calf, he recalled, had been bit into, and its hide peeled back. Seeing the severity of the wounds, the third-generation rancher knew exactly what had happened and what he needed to do.

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From the Jackson Hole News and Guide:

Wyoming wolf numbers have settled in right around 300 animals, near population levels that wildlife managers sought before numbers climbed when hunting was prohibited between 2014 and 2017.

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department regained authority over Canis lupus that April three years ago and held hunting seasons in subsequent falls. The first two years the population fell, followed by a slight increase in 2019. Now the numbers are right around the target, Game and Fish wolf biologist Ken Mills said.

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From the Missoula Current:

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK — The black wolves of Yellowstone are a striking icon that draws many wildlife watchers to the world’s first national park.

But scientists say historically wolves did not have black coats. Cutting-edge science is now revealing the secret behind the origin of the black wolf.

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