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From National Geographic:

Twenty-five years after gray wolves returned to Yellowstone National Park, the predators that some feared would wipe out elk have instead proved to be more of a stabilizing force. New research shows that by reducing populations and thinning out weak and sick animals, wolves are helping create more resilient elk herds.

For the past 12 years, elk numbers in the park’s largest herd have leveled off between about 6,000 and 8,000, instead of extreme boom-and-bust cycles due to climate fluctuations.

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From The Torrington Telegram:

JACKSON — Biologists have had a microscope on the Gros Ventre River drainage for a couple winters now, monitoring how the region’s apex canine carnivores are interacting with their most locally abundant ungulate prey — elk.

Insights are amassing.

Wolves aren’t killing off the elk herd in the broad basin east of Jackson Hole. In fact, none of the dozens of cow elk that have been fitted with GPS collars in the research project have succumbed to wolf predation.

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From the Billings Gazette and the Associated Press:

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — Russ Lucas first noticed in mid-April that an unwelcome neighbor — wolves — were back on his family’s Spring Gulch cattle ranch.

The hindquarter of a calf, he recalled, had been bit into, and its hide peeled back. Seeing the severity of the wounds, the third-generation rancher knew exactly what had happened and what he needed to do.

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From the Jackson Hole News and Guide:

Wyoming wolf numbers have settled in right around 300 animals, near population levels that wildlife managers sought before numbers climbed when hunting was prohibited between 2014 and 2017.

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department regained authority over Canis lupus that April three years ago and held hunting seasons in subsequent falls. The first two years the population fell, followed by a slight increase in 2019. Now the numbers are right around the target, Game and Fish wolf biologist Ken Mills said.

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From the Missoula Current:

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK — The black wolves of Yellowstone are a striking icon that draws many wildlife watchers to the world’s first national park.

But scientists say historically wolves did not have black coats. Cutting-edge science is now revealing the secret behind the origin of the black wolf.

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From KBZK.com in Bozeman, Montana:

The black wolves of Yellowstone are a striking icon that draws many wildlife watchers to the world’s first national park.

But scientists say historically, wolves did not have black coats. Cutting edge science is now revealing the secret behind the origin of the black wolf.

Click here for the full story.

From the Powell Tribune in Wyoming:

The number of wolves in Yellowstone National Park has risen in the past year, according to Doug Smith, the park’s senior wildlife biologist.

Park officials believe there were 80 wolves in Yellowstone last year, as compared to 94 — living in eight separate packs — this year, Smith said during a live presentation on Facebook last week.

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From the Billings Gazette:

Yellowstone National Park wildlife biologists will broadcast on Facebook Live each Tuesday at 11 a.m. MST in March to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the return of wolves to the ecosystem. Speakers will conclude each session by answering questions.

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From the Jackson Hole News & Guide:

Ken Mills noticed something amiss with the Pinnacle Peak Pack while flying over the National Elk Refuge in mid-January during his routine wintertime wolf census.

To the veteran wildlife biologist’s eye, the bedded down wolves looked “nervous” and “disturbed.” One howled. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department wolf biologist then switched his telemetry equipment over to the Huckleberry Pack, typically denizens of northern Jackson Hole. The reason for the edgy body language soon became clear.

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From bozemandailychronicle.com

The day the wolves arrived in Yellowstone National Park was busy. At least that’s how Norm Bishop remembers it.

The wolves came in aluminum crates on horse trailers Jan. 12, 1995. Passing through the gates, the Canadian-born carnivores were the first of their kind in the park in decades, other than the occasional rumor or random sighting.

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