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From the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel:

The gray wolf, a native species that has substantially increased in number in Wisconsin in recent decades and generates strong emotions among the public, will be the focus of a presentation and panel discussion at the 2020 Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Sports Show.

The session will begin with a presentation by Adrian Wydeven titled “Ma’iingan, the wolf returns to Wisconsin: History and future of Federal, State and Tribal management.”

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From the Sawyer County Record in northwest Wisconsin:

David Sohns was driving down his quarter-mile driveway at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 22 off Hendricks Road in the Town of Springbrook, Washburn County, when he came over a hill and noticed something across the entrance.

It was a dead timber wolf.

From nose to tail, it was nearly five feet long with a long, healthy fur coat. It appeared to be a yearling, possibly 1 ½- to 2-years old.

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From wsaw.com

The two-week study, funded through the non-profit Animal Welfare Institute and aided by other organizations, uses acoustic monitors to track the vocalizations of wolves, and wraps up December 29 at the Sandhill Wildlife Area in Wood County.

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From Wisconsin Public Radio:

State officials say the state’s latest wolf count is further evidence that Wisconsin’s wolf population might be stabilizing.

Volunteer trackers reported between 914 and 978 wolves from April 2018 to April 2019, according to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

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From the Wisconsin Rapids Tribune:

WISCONSIN RAPIDS – Recent wolf attacks in central Wisconsin have reignited feuds about the protection of wolves under the Endangered Species Act, which prohibits killing the animals unless human life is in danger.

Ray and Barb Calaway, farmers near Wisconsin Rapids, woke July 8 to find that 13 of their sheep had been killed by wolves. Three days later, Diane Schiller’s 18-year-old dog, Tucker, was killed by a wolf just a quarter mile from the Calaway’s farm.

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From WMTV in Madison, Wisconsin:

MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) — A new billboard on a heavily traveled Madison road takes up a contentious issue: wolves that kill hunting dogs or pets, and the compensation that goes along with it.

The billboard sits near the corner of East Washington Avenue and Stoughton Road, headed northeast toward I-90. It reads, “Wisconsin pays hunters who let wolves kill their dogs.”

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From CBS58.com in Milwaukee, Wisconsin:

TOWN OF HANSEN, Wis. (AP) — A central Wisconsin farm has lost the majority of its livestock in an attack by a pack of wolves.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says 13 sheep were killed on a farm in the Wood County Town of Hansen. WSAW-TV says the dead sheep were discovered Monday. An investigator determined they were killed by wolves. Only one sheep survived.

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From WisFarmer.com:

Wisconsin DNR reports that the wolf population has grown from 14 wolves in 1985 to more than 900 in 2018. This remarkable comeback is due in part to education, legal protection and habitat protection efforts through the DNR. This is an exceptional success story of many stakeholders working together on a collaborative effort.

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From WisContext.org:

As wolves returned to broad swaths of Wisconsin after decades of being extirpated from the state, a tracking program in which volunteers scout for the presence of this predator grew, too.

Since 1978, when the gray wolf (Canis lupus) was identified in Douglas County, the first sighting there in about two decades, the animal’s population across the state sharply increased. By the winter of 2017-2018, the minimum number of wolves in the state stood between 905 and 944, based on the annual count by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

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From the Sawyer County Record:

We’ve all heard of wolves attacking hunting dogs deep in the woods, but we are less likely to hear about a wolf attacking a dog near a home. The latter is raising some concern in the Namakagon area. 

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