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From wpr.org:

A group of Republican lawmakers from northern Wisconsin are pushing a bill that would block game wardens and police from investigating illegal wolf killings in the state.

The legislation would prohibit law enforcement from enforcing any federal or state law that “relates to the management of the wolf population in this state or that prohibits the killing of wolf in this state.” It’s being backed by GOP state Reps. Adam Jarchow of Balsam Lake, Mary Felzkowski of Irma and Romaine Quinn of Rice Lake, and Republican state Sen. Tom Tiffany of Hazelhurst.

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From wsaw.com:

RHINELANDER, Wis. (WSAW)- A group of Wisconsin legislators sent out a memo this week asking for co-sponsors of a bill that would restrict state law enforcement from enforcing state or federal laws related to wolf management. This includes killing a wolf, which is currently protected under the Endangered Species Act.

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From http://fox11online.com:

MADISON (AP) — Some northern Wisconsin legislators are proposing a bill that would end the state’s efforts to manage wolves and force police to ignore wolf killings, unless the federal government removes the animals from the endangered species list.

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From the Spokesman Review:

ENDANGERED SPECIES — While anti-hunting groups celebrated this week’s court ruling that maintains endangered species protections for the thriving wolf population in the Great Lakes, wildlife managers and sportsmen who would like to control wolf numbers may ultimately gain ground from the ruling.   

The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation has voiced optimism that the ruling has provided a path forward to delisting.

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From Public News Service:

MADISON, Wis. – With talk in Washington about changing or reforming the Endangered Species Act, a Wisconsin wolf expert says this is not the time for a change. 

Melissa Smith of Madison, who is the Great Lakes wolf coordinator for the Endangered Species Coalition, points to a success story in the state. Smith says the wolf population is now 925, the highest it’s been since we started counting. 

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