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From NPR.org:

Some wolf puppies are unexpectedly willing to play fetch, according to scientists who saw young wolves retrieve a ball thrown by a stranger and bring it back at that person’s urging.

This behavior wouldn’t be surprising in a dog. But wolves are thought to be less responsive to human cues because they haven’t gone through thousands of years of domestication.

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From The Local.SE in Sweden:

Sweden’s wolf population isn’t related to dogs at all, a new study shows.

Researchers at Uppsala University used new methods to investigate the origin of Sweden’s wolf population.

Although Scandinavian wolves are thought to have more or less died out during the 1960s, the animal made a sudden comeback in the Värmland region two decades later.

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From newsinenglish.no:

Norwegian wildlife authorities have confirmed the discovery of a litter of baby wolves in Oslo’s eastern forest known as Østmarka. That brings the number of new wolf litters to three in Norway and a fourth along the border to Sweden, prompting other state officials to authorize a new wolf hunt this winter that’s sure to be debated.

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From TheLocal.se in Sweden:

There will be no licensed wolf hunt in Sweden this winter, after the Environmental Protection Agency said it could not take place due to dwindling numbers of wild wolves.

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From sciencenordic.com:

Moose, wolves, wolverines and other wild animals cross between Norway and Sweden with no awareness of a border. 

But there are definite demarcations in the two countries’ game management politics and policies.

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From TheLocal.se in Sweden:

Sweden’s Environmental Protection Agency (Naturvärdsverket) is trialing a new method of calculating the country’s stock of wild wolves: collecting and analysing their excrement.

The current model estimates the population based on the number of young found that season, but it does not take into account the animals that die during the same period. The method has been criticised by both the Swedish Carnivore Association and the Swedish Society for Nature Conservation.

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From The Local in Sweden:

The wolf hunt is set to go ahead in Sweden today, after a court decided not to call off the cull.

Campaigners had appealed to the highest administrative court in Sweden less than a week before the start of the hunt. The Supreme Administrative Court has not yet decided whether or not to grant them leave to appeal, but said it would not call off the hunt at the eleventh hour in the meantime.

Twenty-two wolves are to be culled in the licensed hunt, which takes place in five counties between January 2nd and February 15th, with a limit on the number which may be killed in each county.

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From www.turkeytelegraph.com:

The previous day in Lyon, France, government’s “Wolf Project”, prepared to protect wolves, infuriated farmers. The “Plan Loup” in Lyon, anti-wolf project, was poured into streets. “In 2015, wolves slaughtered 9,000 tamed animals in France,” demonstrators said, saying that defenders of wild wolves suffered greatly.

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From The Local in Sweden:

Five county administrative boards in wolf country in the Svealand and southern Norrland regions agreed on Thursday that two wolves in Örebro and Gävleborg counties may be shot in next year’s licensed hunt, as well as six wolves in each county in Dalarna, Värmland and Västmanland.

“We think it’s way too little. Shooting two wolves, as in certain areas, does nothing. If you want to reduce the pressure you have to remove the entire territory, as was done in the last licensed hunt. We think it is wrong to abandon that principle,” Torbjörn Löwbom, chairman of the hunting association’s predator committee, told the TT news agency.

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