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From the Capital Press in the western United States:

WINSTON, Ore. — In her first six months as a conflict prevention specialist in Southwestern Oregon, Alyssa Mahaney contacted and advised 80 livestock owners.

On three ranches — two in Jackson County and one in Klamath County — she and her horse have ridden the properties, checking on the cattle and looking for wildlife sign, specifically that of wolves. She has also spent several nights patrolling those ranches in her pickup truck.

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From KMTR TV in Eugene, Oregon:

EUGENE, Ore. – Oregon recognized an area between Highway 58 and Highway 138 in Lane and Douglas counties as an Area of Known Wolf Activity in March 2019.

Evidence that the Indigo wolves had reproduced emerged last fall, based on trail camera photos captured in August.

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From the Baker City Herald in Baker City, Oregon:

A member of the Baker County committee that reviews ranchers’ requests for compensation for livestock killed by wolves told county commissioners Thursday that he believes the system is broken.

Martin Arritola, one of seven members of the Wolf Depredation Compensation Committee, said he believes the system, administered through the Oregon Department of Agriculture, is failing.

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From the Herald and News in Klamath Falls, Oregon:

It’s too soon to tell what 2020 will bring for wolves in Klamath County, but the Klamath County Wolf Depredation Compensation Committee has put some funding aside to be proactive whatever the case.

Committee members on Wednesday morning allocated $11,876 toward education, range-riding services, and compensation for one wolf kill in 2019 to prepare for 2020.

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From nytimes.com

Wildlife officials are investigating the death of OR-54, a female wolf whose carcass was found in Northern California.

It had been weeks since biologists at the California Department of Fish and Wildlife were able to track the gray wolf’s movements.

She had been crisscrossing Northern California for nearly two years, after she separated from her pack in Oregon and traversed state lines. Biologists had followed her movements using a radio collar that wildlife specialists in Oregon placed around her neck in 2017.

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From mycolumbiabasin.com

PENDLETON, Oregon – The Umatilla County Board of Commissioners has approved distributing $53,114.57 to livestock producers and agricultural research organizations in the county for wolf depredation. Chairman John Shafer said the funding is not just for the damage done by attacking wolves.

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From The Corvalis Advocate:

New photographic evidence shows that Oregon’s wolf population is moving further westward.   

On January 3, game cameras set up by Eric Anderson of Jacksonville captured the likeness of a gray wolf on federal land near Lower Table Rock.  

“He wandered right in front of it, and the light was right,” Anderson told the Mail Tribune. 

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From mailtribune.com

When a 2-year-old gray wolf dubbed OR-7 for the number on its GPS-transmitting collar trotted southwest from Northeast Oregon in search of a mate in 2011, the cross-country journey created history.

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From The Lewiston Tribune and the Associated Press:

PORTLAND, Ore. — Experts say trail cameras have captured new images of the only wolves known to live in Oregon’s Cascades.

The Oregonian/OregonLive reported the cameras, which operate as part of a collaboration between Defenders of Wildlife and Cascadia Wild, caught pictures of the adult canids, believed to be the breeding pair of the White River Pack.

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From the Mail Tribune:

OR-7’s Rogue Pack of protected gray wolves taste for beef hasn’t waned, but this time it’s moved from Ted Birdseye’s ranch to the Rancheria area, authorities said.

The pack on Monday was officially blamed for the killings of two cow calves found in two consecutive days last week in the Rancheria area east of Butte Falls, according to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

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