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From NewsinEnglish.no in Norway:

WWF won a long-sought victory this week when an appeals court ruled that two out of three wolf hunts authorized by state officials in 2017 and 2018 were invalid. The hunts involved wolves belonging to managed and protected packs, while a third hunt won court approval.

The hunt allowed in the winter of 2017-2018, when snow makes it easiest to track wolves down, locally authorized the shooting of 50 wolves. Government officials pared that down to 42. A total of 28 wolves were actually shot, with WWF arguing that the number authorized was far too high and that the hunt threatened survival of the species.

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From LivingstonLedger.com:

Norway is home to nine breeding wolf packs

Norway‘s government on Friday paved the way for recreational hunting of wolves, a policy reversal that incensed green campaigners seeking to protect the endangered species.

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From NewsinEnglish.no in Norway:

Around 130 hunters in eastern Norway spent New Year’s Day stalking and quickly killing two more wolves, after conservationists failed to obtain an injunction to halt it. One legal expert has warned that the highly controversial wolf hunt exposes Norway to international boycotts of export products and services.

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From NewsinEnglish.no in Norway:

Climate and Environment Minister Ola Elvestuen came home from the UN climate meeting in Poland to immediately face howling from all sides, once again over Norway’s growing but still fragile wolf population. Now no one is happy, because Elvestuen is allowing a hunt in a protected zone for the first time, but not allowing hunts in other areas where they were expected.

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From The Local:

Animal rights activists in Norway have begun boycotting local sheep meat in protest at a new round of licensed wolf hunts planned for this winter.
 
More than 800 Norwegians have joined the Facebook Page Boikott konfliktkjøtt (Boycott Conflict Meat), which aims to pressure farmers to accept that the predators have a right to share Norway’s outdoor spaces with their flocks. 
 

From newsinenglish.no:

Norwegian wildlife authorities have confirmed the discovery of a litter of baby wolves in Oslo’s eastern forest known as Østmarka. That brings the number of new wolf litters to three in Norway and a fourth along the border to Sweden, prompting other state officials to authorize a new wolf hunt this winter that’s sure to be debated.

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From TheLocal.no:

The Oslo District Court ruled on Friday that wolf hunting licences granted last winter were legal in a decision that dealt a blow to the World Wide Fund for Nature’s efforts to protect the endangered species.
The World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) had sued the Norwegian state in an effort to halt wolf hunting in the counties of Østfold, Oslo, Akershus and Hedmark.

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From NewsinEnglish.no in Norway:

Norway’s internationally controversial wolf hunt spurred more demonstrations over the weekend, this time to save the country’s wolves from what many fear will be threatened extinction once again. The new Norwegian government minister in charge of climate and environment issues also wants to protect wolves, but claims he must allow the hunt to proceed since it was backed by a majority in Parliament.

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From The Local:

The WWF’s suit against the Norwegian state asked the court to examine Norwegian laws on control of wolf populations, and to suspend hunting in the counties of Østfold, Oslo, Akershus and Hedmark, while investigations take place, reports news agency NTB.

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From www.newsinenglish.no in Norway:

Hunters authorized to shoot a wolf that’s believed to have killed more than 100 free-grazing sheep this summer think they succeeded during the night. They claim they shot a large female wolf in Østre Toten, just as she was stalking more sheep.

“It’s hopefully the one that’s been ravaging flocks all summer,” Kjell Bakken, leader of the hunting team, told Norwegian Broadcaster (NRK) Monday morning. “This is a great relief. It’s been a tough summer, not least for those using the open grazing areas and for us hunters.”

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