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From GoodNewsNetwork.org:

Recovery efforts for one of North America’s most charismatic and persecuted species, the Mexican wolf, received a huge boost this spring as 20 wolf pups born in captivity were successfully integrated within wild packs across the southwest United States.

Captive breeding programs in zoos and wolf centers in Missouri, New Mexico, Kansas, California, Arizona, provided the 20 pups from seven different litters, which were in turn placed among seven wild packs in Arizona and New Mexico. The innovative program is managed by the Arizona Game and Fish Department with extensive support from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

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From KVOA.com in Tucson, Arizona:

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Wildlife managers are investigating the deaths of two Mexican gray wolves found in May in New Mexico.

The team that oversees recovery of the endangered species in New Mexico and Arizona has documented a dozen mortalities among the wild population over the first five months of this year.

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From The Durango Herald:

FARMINGTON – A wildlife activist group has filed Freedom of Information Act requests in hopes of understanding why federal agencies killed four Mexican gray wolves in New Mexico.

The Center for Biological Diversity said it is trying to determine if the state’s livestock industry swayed the agencies’ decision to kill the animals.

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From the Roswell Daily Record:

Chaves County is preparing to go another round with a federal agency about the Mexican wolf.

County Manager Stanton Riggs said the county intends to partner with other counties before signing a memorandum of understanding sent by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that governs how the agency will develop a new rule about establishing experimental populations of the species in New Mexico and Arizona.

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From the Payson Roundup:

What’s in a word?

Like “essential.”

Quite a bit, as it turns out.

So the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is once again seeking public comment on another interesting wrinkle in the 40-year effort to return Mexican wolves to the wild in Arizona and New Mexico.

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From Cronkite News:

PHOENIX – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service authorized the killing of four endangered Mexican gray wolves in New Mexico during one week in late March, a move conservation groups call a significant setback to wolf recovery.

A spokesperson said the agency used “non-lethal management techniques to the maximum extent practicable” to control the wolf population and that “lethal removal” was authorized only as a last resort in response to livestock killed over several months.

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From The Associated Press and KNAU.org:

U.S. wildlife officials are seeking public comment as they prepare to update a rule that guides management of endangered Mexican gray wolves in the Southwest.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it will be working on a supplemental environmental review of the 2015 rule.

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From tucson.com:

Authorities are offering a reward for information in connection with the suspicious deaths of two Mexican gray wolves near Pinetop.

Wildlife officials recovered the bodies of the endangered animals on March 22 and 23 off Porter Mountain Road in the Apache Sitgreaves National Forest, about 200 miles northeast of Tucson.

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From the Santa Fe New Mexican:

ALBUQUERQUE — The killing of four Mexican gray wolves by U.S. wildlife officials has drawn the ire of environmentalists who say management of the species is undercutting efforts to restore the endangered predators to the American Southwest.

Documents made public Tuesday show the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took the action in March after hazing, diversionary food caches and other nonlethal means failed to get the predators to stop killing cattle in two rural areas of Western New Mexico.

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From the Albuquerque Journal:

Last month’s killing of four Mexican gray wolves in southwestern New Mexico by federal agencies has prompted outcries from wildlife groups.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on March 18 said there were 163 endangered Mexican gray wolves in the wild in New Mexico and Arizona, a population increase for the second year in a row.

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