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From The Times in the UK:

The first wild wolf cubs born in Belgium since the 19th century are being guarded at a secret location to prevent hunters from killing them.

The four cubs were born on Tuesday to August and Noella, two wolves who crossed into Flanders from the Netherlands and formed a pack.

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From NLTimes.NL in the Netherlands:

A survey commissioned by the Dutch government showed that despite recent incidents of wolves attacking farm animals, a majority of Dutch people have no problem coexisting with the animals. Some 57 percent said they found it acceptable that wolves settle in the Netherlands, up from 45 percent in 2012, Minister Carola Schouten said in a letter to Parliament this week.

Schouten, the minister in charge of nature and agriculture, said that 65 percent of people think wolves are essentially harmless. “Most Dutch people will therefore not avoid nature reserves with wolves, and an encounter with a wild wolf would be considered a special experience for most Dutch people (77%), and almost half of the Dutch would like to encounter a wolf in the wild,” Schouten said.

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From DutchNews.nl:

Four highland cattle calves roaming on a nature reserve near the Brabant village of Someren appear to have been killed by wolves, experts say. The four calves, all around one year old and weighing between 80 and 100 kilos, have all been killed on the Kievitsloop reserve in the last three weeks. They appear to have been taken by the throat, after which their organs have been eaten, a method of killing which experts say is the typical work of a wolf.

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From KXAN36news.com:

The wolves, Noëlla, and August is already around for a while in the province of Limburg, but it could also be a new, wild wolves have been seen in the province of Antwerp, Belgium. The desk Welkomwolf.be on Monday, several sightings of the wolves, has been investigating the wolf and the tracks of the animals that receive it, based in Rijkevorsel, Mol and Lille.

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From DutchNews.nl:

A male wolf may be settling in the north of the province of Drenthe but no mate has been located so far, local broadcaster RTV Drenthe  reports. The suspicion that the wolf may be settling in the province is based on figures from BIJ12, an organisation which monitors damage done by wild, protected animals.

Read more at DutchNews.nl:

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From DutchNews.nl in the Netherlands:

A young wolf has been knocked down and killed by a car near Epe by the Veluwe heathlands, forester Ger Verwoerd from nature organisation Geldersche Landschappen & Kastelen has confirmed. The wolf was hit on Wednesday morning and ran into the woods where it was later found dead. The driver had alerted police who used a specialist hunting dog to track the wounded animal.

Read more at DutchNews.nl:

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From DutchNews.nl:

A filmmaker has captured the clearest pictures yet of the wolf pack that is living in the Veluwe national park. At least three cubs have been born in the pack and rangers say there could be as many as five young wolves living with the three adults. The pictures, taken by wildlife photographer Patrick van Es, show two of the cubs walking across the heathland. 

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From ABCNews.com:

Wolves are officially back in the Netherlands, two centuries after the animals were hunted to extinction in the country, after a pair produced a litter in the wild — news welcomed Thursday by conservationists.

The province of Gelderland posted a video online this week showing three young wolves in a forest clearing, though the province said in a statement there could be up to five pups. The province did not reveal the exact location of the footage, saying it does not want people to disturb the animals.

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From Care2.com:

The Netherlands has a resident wolf population after 140 years without wolves making their home in the Dutch country, but not everyone is happy.

Ecologists report that two female wolves have settled in the Hoge Veluwe nature reserve, with a male also roaming in that same region. Experts from groups such as FreeNature and Wolven in Nederland, as well as scientists from Wageningen University, have been tracking paw prints and scat (wolf droppings) since wolves were first sighted back in the Netherlands in 2015. At the time of their sightings, it seemed likely the wolves were passing over the border from Germany and would return there in short order.

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From DutchNews.nl:

A female wolf which has been roaming the northern part of the Veluwe national park in Gelderland can now be considered to be the first wolf to be officially settled there and off-spring may be on the way, wolf monitoring organisation Wolven in Nederland claims. A wolf is considered settled when it stays in a certain area for longer than six months. DNA in the wolf droppings, show that this is the case for Veluwe wolf GW998F, the organisation said, while droppings from a male wolf and tracks in the snow from both animals suggest that the female has found a mate.

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