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From MinnPost in Minnesota:

Every year, gray wolves kill dozens, if not hundreds, of farm animals in Minnesota.

It’s not just wolves – coyotes also known to sometimes prey on livestock for food. But with wolves it’s different: If a coyote is after an animal, a farmer is well within their right to shoot it. Wolves, on the other hand, are federally protected under the Endangered Species Act, which means only government agents can legally kill them unless they’re threatening a human life.

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From the Grand Forks Herald:

The Department of Natural Resources has contracted with a federal trapper to capture and radio-collar gray wolves in Red Lake Wildlife Management Area and adjacent lands in northwest Minnesota this winter as part of a routine wolf population estimate the DNR conducts every year.

The goal of the effort now underway is to collar four to six wolves in separate packs, said John Erb, wildlife research scientist for the DNR’s Forest Wildlife Populations and Research Group in Grand Rapids, Minn. The DNR uses data from the collared wolves to compile information on average pack size and average territory size, Erb said.

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From MinnPost in Minnesota:

At its low point in the 1950s, Minnesota’s gray wolf population was estimated to be just 400 animals. As of 2018, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources estimates there are over 2,600 gray wolves in the state.

That recovery is a success story for the Endangered Species Act, a law signed by President Richard Nixon in 1973 that implemented federal protections for a variety of species throughout the U.S.

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From Minnesota Public Radio:

Farmers, ranchers, hunters and wildlife advocates filled a Brainerd auditorium Tuesday night to give passionate testimony for and against a proposal to remove federal protections for gray wolves.

The hearing was the only opportunity, anywhere in the country, for members of the public to give input in person on the proposal by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to take gray wolves off the endangered and threatened species list — which, among other things, makes it illegal to kill a wolf unless it’s threatening a human.

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From WDIO in northern Minnesota:

It’s a dog owner’s worst nightmare. 

Paul Moore’s beloved 3-year-old chocolate lab, Venom, was attacked by wolves May 15. 

Paul and Venom were out shed hunting, or looking for deer antlers, off of Observation Road in Duluth. 

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From the St. Paul Pioneer Press:

A bid to fully ban wolf hunting in Minnesota appears to have fallen short of reaching the desk of Gov. Tim Walz, who had indicated he likely would have signed it.

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From the Grand Forks Herald:

The Minnesota Deer Hunters Association is asking Gov. Tim Walz to reconsider his stance opposing a gray wolf season if the federal government returns management to the state. Legislation to restore a wolf hunt if the state regains management was narrowly defeated in the Minnesota House of Representatives earlier in the legislative session.

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From MinnPost in Minnesota:

The last time the federal government removed endangered species protections for wolves in Minnesota, the state held recreational hunts aimed in part at culling the population. The open seasons between 2012 and 2014 were controversial, yet backed by both Democratic and Republican leaders, including DFL Gov. Mark Dayton.

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From MPRNews.com:

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz says he supports legislation to ban the recreational hunting of wolves in Minnesota if the federal government succeeds in removing them from the threatened list.

An amendment to prohibit sport wolf hunting was added to a House environmental bill Tuesday. On Wednesday, the governor said that when he was in Congress he supported “delisting” wolves where populations had recovered, but not nationwide.

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From the Pioneer Press in St. Paul, Minnesota:

By a one-vote margin, the Minnesota House on Tuesday voted to ban hunting on wolves — a victory for wolf protectionists hoping to gird against the Trump administration’s plan to remove protections for the iconic animal.

A ban on wolf hunting would be a reversal for Minnesota — the only state in the Lower 48 where the animals were never eradicated and the first to adopt a hunting season when it became legal again several years ago.

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