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From MichiganRadio.com:

Michigan state wildlife officials say the wolf population in the Upper Peninsula remains “healthy and stable.”

The Department of Natural Resources completed its biennial wolf survey between December and March.

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From The Detroit News:

A sheep farmer who appears to have posed holding a large, dead wolf on his Upper Peninsula farm might now regret the snapshot.

So might his father, who waited off-camera to remove the trophy so the trapper and his wife could turn its fangs, pelt and skull into jewelry and lodge décor, authorities say.

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From The Detroit News:

Pickford — The undercover officer followed Kurt Johnston Duncan to his “bait pen,” about 200 yards from his cabin along a marsh.

Two bald eagles lay among the deer remains. One eagle was still in an illegal snare meant for a gray wolf or another predator.

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From the Duluth News Tribune in Minnesota:

The caribou of the Lake Superior region, which once numbered in the thousands across a wide swath of three states and Ontario, are surviving on just two islands and a small herd on the mainland as their future continues to be uncertain.

After a dramatic airlift operation in 2018, an estimated 23 caribou seem to be doing well on Ontario’s Slate Islands on Lake Superior, with maybe 10 on Caribou Island on the big lake. About 20 survive on the North Shore mainland east of Marathon, Ontario.

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From the Washington Times and the Associated Press:

LANSING, Mich. (AP) – Some Michigan lawmakers believe the federal government should open Isle Royale National Park to moose hunters.

MLive.com reports that the House Natural Resources Committee heard testimony last week on a resolution supporting a limited moose hunt on the Lake Superior island. A vote could come at the next meeting.

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From MLive.com:

ISLE ROYALE, MI – More than a year into the National Park Service’s relocation effort to create strong wolf packs on Michigan’s remote Isle Royale, researchers have found the new predators are having no problem taking down members of the island’s teeming moose population.

Researchers who spent this summer tracking wolf kill sites found the remains of 60 prey animals. Most of these were moose, but evidence showed the wolves were also feasting on snowshoe hares and beavers.

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From BridgeMI.com:

ONTONAGON — Bouncing along a sodden farm pasture, Brad Johnson stopped his state vehicle when he came upon the newborn calf, or what remained of it.

The veteran wildlife handler had been to this patch of farmland in the western Upper Peninsula several times the previous fall, when a dozen calves from the Dykstra beef ranch were reported missing.

Gray wolves were suspected in those disappearances. But Johnson had little reason to fear for his own safety on this wet spring day; the local wolf pack was not considered a threat to people.

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From 9and10news.com:

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel is pushing back against a federal plan to drop gray wolves from the endangered species list.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says gray wolf populations have recovered in the lower 48 states, so the agency wants to hand off the responsibility of managing the species to states.

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From Patch.com/michigan:

MICHIGAN — The Michigan Department of Natural Resources two men suspected in two separate, unrelated wolf poaching incidents have confessed to shooting them.

Both men are from the Upper Peninsula. The incidents happened in Ontonagon and Menominee counties and now the case is being reviewed for possible charges.

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From mlive.com:

ISLE ROYALE, MI – Just months after the National Park Service started a relocation program to trap and transport new wolves to Michigan’s remote Isle Royale in hopes of boosting the dwindling pack, a winter survey that will give researchers their first peek at how the new wolves are fitting into their new home might be called off because of the ongoing federal government shutdown.

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