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From the White Mountain Independent:

The long, expensive effort to return Mexican Gray Wolves to the wild continues its stutter step – forward and back, forward and back.

This year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service introduced 20 wolf pups born in captivity into the dens of wolves roaming wild in Arizona and New Mexico.

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From wmicentral.com

WHITE MOUNTAINS — A staffer with White Mountain Apache Tribe Game & Fish was part of a helicopter team during the recent wolf count.

Wolf technician Joseph Perez acted as a successful gunner, darting his first wolf from the chopper in only two shots.

Perez is a veteran of the US Army Airborne Special Forces.

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From wmicentral.com/

Fuller is a wolf biologist with Arizona Game & Fish, part of the Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team. When the annual wolf count is held in January, one of the tasks she takes on is “helicopter mugger,” the person who helps locate, count and capture wolves from a chopper.

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Form abqjournal.com

RESERVE – U.S. Fish and Wildlife crews fly above the forests of Catron County in a helicopter. A nearby airplane relays the location of a Mexican gray wolf. Fresh snow has made the animals easier to spot from the air.

“Starting pursuit,” the helicopter crew broadcasts over the radio.

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From the White Mountain Independent:

PINETOP — Residents of Alpine, Arizona and Reserve, New Mexico and surrounding areas may notice a low-flying helicopter in the region between Jan. 22 and Feb. 4 as biologists conduct their annual Mexican wolf population survey and capture.

The flights are part of the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, a multi-agency cooperative effort among the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Service Inspection Service – Wildlife Services, and the White Mountain Apache Tribe.

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From azcentral.com

Three decades into a troubled attempt to reintroduce Mexican gray wolves to their native habitat, more than 60 leading environmentalists and scientists have called on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to revamp its wolf management plan and, in effect, start over.

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From The Daily Courier:

Growing up on the F-Bar ranch in Snowflake, I know how important the cattle ranching industry is to Arizona’s economy. I also know ranching is both hard and humbling. Ranchers do not need the federal government making it any more challenging.

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From Grand Canyon News:

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From Mexico News Daily:

Five more wolf pups have given a small boost to the precarious Mexican gray wolf population.

The wolves were born in April at the Desert Museum in Saltillo, Coahuila, thanks to ongoing efforts by Mexico and the United States to aid in the recovery of the animal’s numbers.

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From White Mountain Independent:

APACHE COUNTY — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has issued its first update in 35 years to the recovery plan for the endangered Mexican gray wolf.

The Draft Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, first revision, was released to the public June 30. The 42-page plan outlines the current status and background of wolf recovery efforts, as well as providing a detailed recovery strategy. The recovery strategy lists specific goals that must be met before the Mexican gray wolf can be downgraded to threatened status, or delisted. The Draft Recovery Plan is accompanied by a 253-page Draft Biological Report which provides the detailed science on which the recovery plan is based.

 

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