Posts

From The Daily Courier:

Growing up on the F-Bar ranch in Snowflake, I know how important the cattle ranching industry is to Arizona’s economy. I also know ranching is both hard and humbling. Ranchers do not need the federal government making it any more challenging.

For the full story, click here.

From Grand Canyon News:

For the full story, click here.

From Mexico News Daily:

Five more wolf pups have given a small boost to the precarious Mexican gray wolf population.

The wolves were born in April at the Desert Museum in Saltillo, Coahuila, thanks to ongoing efforts by Mexico and the United States to aid in the recovery of the animal’s numbers.

For the full story, click here

From White Mountain Independent:

APACHE COUNTY — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has issued its first update in 35 years to the recovery plan for the endangered Mexican gray wolf.

The Draft Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, first revision, was released to the public June 30. The 42-page plan outlines the current status and background of wolf recovery efforts, as well as providing a detailed recovery strategy. The recovery strategy lists specific goals that must be met before the Mexican gray wolf can be downgraded to threatened status, or delisted. The Draft Recovery Plan is accompanied by a 253-page Draft Biological Report which provides the detailed science on which the recovery plan is based.

 

For the full story, click here.

From Artesia Daily Press:

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — State wildlife officials are reviewing the federal government’s plan for recovering endangered wolves that once roamed parts of New Mexico, Arizona and northern Mexico.

A draft was recently released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as the agency works to meet a court-ordered deadline to have the plan completed by the end of November.

For the full story, click here.

From Daily Miner:

The Arizona Game and Fish Department was monitoring 58 endangered Mexican wolves wearing radio collars at the end of May, the department reported in its latest update.

The overall population of the wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico was 113 at the end of 2016.

Annual surveys are conducted by field teams in the winter when the population has the least amount of natural fluctuation. The spring population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups.

Wolves with functioning radio collars are listed by studbook number in the pack updates. They’re given an identification number preceded by capital M (male) or F (female) for adult wolves and lowercase letters for wolves younger than 24 months.

Arizona Game and Fish was tracking 10 different packs of wolves in May. The Baldy Pack was not located during the month. It has been more than three months since the Baldy Pack was located and their fate is now considered unknown.

 

For the full story, click here.

From White Mountain Independent:

There was no howling — either for or against the Mexican gray wolf at the Apache County Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday.

The meeting featured a presentation by Paul Greer, of the Arizona Game and Fish Department. Greer is the leader of the Interagency Field Team that manages the wolves in Arizona.

Greer gave an overview of his team’s priorities, and their work throughout the year, which varies by season.

Greer said the team’s top priorities are to monitor the wolf population and its expansion, conduct an annual year-end count of the population, and help to mitigate the effects of the wolf’s reintroduction on area residents and ranchers.

 

For the full story, click here.

From AZ Central:

Wildlife officials are investigating the death of an endangered Mexican gray wolf pup.

Federal and state officials involved in the wolf reintroduction program say a female pup belonging to the Diamond Pack that roams southeastern Arizona was found dead in May. The death was noted in a report released this week.

 

For the full story, click here.