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From the Clearwater Tribune in Idaho:

Control actions are intended to boost elk herds, and have taken place in eight of the last nine years. Idaho Fish and Game has concluded wolf control actions done during February that removed 17 wolves in the Lolo elk zone north of Highway 12. Similar control actions have taken place in eight of the last nine years to reduce predation and improve elk survival in this herd that is well below elk management objectives.

The operation was conducted under the guidance of Fish and Game’s Elk Management Plan and Lolo Predation Management Plan.

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From the Idaho Statesman:

On Thursday, the Idaho Fish and Game Commission will decide on a petition that would require trappers to post signs warning of active traps nearby — a move that the petitioners say would save dogs from being caught in traps, and which trappers say would expose their trap lines to tampering.

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From the Idaho County Free Press:

During their meeting in Boise on Jan. 23, the Idaho Fish and Game Commission voted to increase the maximum number of wolf tags an individual can purchase to 15 hunting tags and 15 trapping tags for the 2020-21 season.

The changes to the allowable tag numbers for wolves applies statewide, simplifying the wolf hunting and trapping seasons and rules. 

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From the Lexington Herald Leader:

Legislation sending just under $400,000 to a state board to use to kill problem wolves in Idaho headed to the governor’s desk on Wednesday.

The Senate voted 26-4 to approve the budget bill that taps money in the state’s general fund to kill wolves that prey on livestock or wildlife.

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From The Lewiston Tribune in Idaho:

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game announced Monday that it killed 17 wolves in the state’s remote Lolo Zone last month as part of a long-running effort to help struggling elk herds there.

The agency has carried out wolf control operations there for eight of the last nine years. This year, like last, the agency used a private contractor to kill the wolves by shooting them from helicopters. In previous years, the agency partnered with the U.S. Wildlife Services agency to carry out the work.

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From the Idaho State Journal:

USDA Wildlife Services has reached a settlement with five conservation organizations agreeing to temporarily stop using lethal methods to target gray wolves on certain public lands and to suspend its use of M-44s, also known as “cyanide bombs.”

The new restrictions will remain in place until the federal agency completes an environmental review of the impacts of killing wolves.

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From the Idaho Statesman:

An appeals court on Monday handed down its decisions pertaining to a 2016 helicopter operation in which the Idaho Department of Fish and Game violated the National Environmental Policy Act by attaching radio collars to four wolves.

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals confirmed parts of a 2017 ruling by an Idaho federal judge and overturned other parts, according to court documents.

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From the Idaho Mountain Express:

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission formally expanded wolf hunting and trapping opportunities across the state via conference call on Thursday, opening up year-round wolf hunting in a majority of Idaho’s game units and approving 11-month hunting seasons in others.

The ruling, primarily enacted to decrease wolf predation on livestock and elk herds, followed the commission’s Jan. 23 vote to raise Idaho’s wolf hunting and trapping tag limit from five to 15 wolves per person.

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From IdahoPress.com:

BOISE — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game Commission on Thursday extended wolf hunting and trapping seasons.

The unanimous vote put nine proposals into effect that extended the wolf hunting and trapping seasons in much of Southwest Idaho, where wolves are fairly rare. The commission’s consideration of the topic brought in an enormous amount of public comment with 27,076 electronic statements pouring from people worldwide.

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From KREM.com:

MOSCOW, Idaho — University of Idaho researchers say they’ve found success using a more efficient and cheaper way to estimate the number of wolves living in the Gem State.

The team’s secret tool? DNA.

Using DNA from wolves that were killed by hunters or were killed for other reasons, the UI study identified wolf sibling groups and provided estimates for breeding pairs in Idaho.

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