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From Bloomberg.com:

The number of wolf attacks in Germany is spiraling out of control and having a “devastating” impact on livestock farmers, according to the industry’s lobby group.

Almost 2,900 animals, most of them sheep and goats, were injured or killed in wolf attacks in 2019, the DBV farmers’ association said Wednesday, citing figures from a government body that researches wolves. While environmental groups welcome the increase in the animal’s numbers in the wild, the DBV called for urgent action to address the issue.

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From EUReporter.co:

European citizens support protection for wolves, and the majority oppose the killing of wolves in any circumstances. This is the main outcome of an opinion poll among adults across six EU countries commissioned by Eurogroup for Animals. It’s time for politicians to listen to the voice of their electors and ensure that the species continues to be strictly protected.

Conducted by​Savanta ComRes in six EU member states – France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Poland and Finland the survey aimed to better understand public perceptions and attitudes towards wolf protection across Europe.

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From NTD.com:

BERLIN—The wolf is back. While common in other parts of the world, in Germany, the wolf is still a novelty.

It was gone for almost 100 years. Coming from Poland to Germany, over the last decades the wild wolf population has been expanding all over the country, currently growing at about 36 percent per year.

Some are celebrating its comeback sinc

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From DW.com:

The number of wolf packs in Germany has increased to 105, according to official numbers for 2019 released on Monday.

That compares to 77 wolf packs from the previous monitoring study conducted in 2017/18 by the Federal Agency for Nature Conservation and a government wolf advising center.

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From DW.com:

The return of wolves to Germany is often presented as a two-sided debate: It’s a battle between the natural rights of wolves to inhabit what was historically their homeland and the economic damage they inflict on farmers.

The benefits of having an apex predator roam the forests in population-dense Germany are abstract when compared to the tangible livestock deaths they cause and the palpable fear they can evoke. And, as with so many controversial environmental topics, the economic argument tends to win out.

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From Reuters.com:

BERLIN (Reuters) – Germany’s cabinet agreed on Wednesday to loosen tight restrictions on shooting wolves to help tackle the growing threat they pose to livestock after a year-long row within Chancellor Angela Merkel’s coalition.

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From the Independent in the UK:

They struck at dawn and left a trail of blood and body parts. There were six, maybe seven perpetrators. One had calmly passed Annett Hertweck’s car as she was speeding down the forest path to the scene of the massacre near the eastern village of Forstgen, Germany. Only then did she see the bodies. Dozens of them.

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From Yahoo.com:

The German government is mulling some weighty threats these days, Brexit, US auto tariffs… and wolves. 

Canis lupus lupus, aka the European grey wolf, is back from extinction and into the middle of the political debate. What to do about the rapidly expanding wolf population was on the docket at the Bundestag in Berlin this week.

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