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From The Denver Post:

COLD SPRINGS MOUNTAIN — A lone black heifer wailed, wandering into white mist as night fell across a sage-studded plateau in the middle of where a wolf pack has moved into northwestern Colorado.

Rancher T. Wright Dickinson looked on, frowning, aggrieved — an arch conservative westerner whose family has run cattle here since 1885 on high country spanning three states that ranks among the last large open landscapes.

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From OutThereColorado.com:

Wolf sightings are on the rise in Colorado amid verification that a pack is roaming a remote area of the state. Since then, a number of people have claimed to have spotted this predator, including multiple instances that involved a wolf-like creature approaching a campsite.

According to Aspen Times, two hikers spotted what they believe to be a wolf, described as a 100-plus pound “beigey-white canid.” At the time of the sighting, they were hiking along a trail at Crater Lake – a route frequented by visitors to Aspen’s iconic Maroon Bells. The animal was briefly spotted before disappearing into the forest.

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From 5280.com:

Around 9 p.m. on January 4, Joshua Carney, half of the Craig Press’ two-person reporting team, got a news tip. A local woman said that while hunting in northwestern Colorado’s Irish Canyon recently, her brother had come across an elk carcass that had been “ripped to pieces.” In the snow beside it, the predator had left a series of tracks shaped like dog paws, save for one distinguishing feature: They were big. Really big. Big enough for a wolf.

Although Carney, 27, had only been on the job a few months, he’d already looked into several similar leads. When he’d called Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW), his inquiries were usually met with a chuckle. Yes, CPW had checked it out, and, no, it wasn’t a wolf. “The calls have happened forever,” Carney says. “People can’t tell the difference between a wolf and a coyote.”

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From the Aspen Times in Colorado:

The Glenwood Springs office of Colorado Parks and Wildlife has received five reports of wolf sightings in the region so far this spring and summer.

None of the sightings has been substantiated but the activity indicates people are staying alert as wolf sightings become more common in Colorado’s mountains, said CPW area wildlife manager Matt Yamashita.

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From The Denver Post:

Backers of a ballot measure to reintroduce gray wolves in Colorado say there’s no chance they’ll withdraw their initiative, despite a push from opponents after more reports of wolf sightings in Colorado.

“We will be going to the ballot because the only way Colorado will ever have a self-sustaining gray wolf population again is through reintroduction,” said Rob Edward of the Rocky Mountain Wolf Action Fund.

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From the Colorado Sun:

As the wolf reintroduction fight howls in Colorado, wildlife officials are fielding more reports from people who suspect they’ve spotted a wolf in the wild.

release from Colorado Parks and Wildlife last week noted they are tracking a wolf in Jackson County and a pack of six wolves in northwest Colorado. The agency reported a “credible wolf sighting” in the Laramie River Valley of Larimer County and posted photos of a “large wolf-like animal” spotted by campers in Grand County.

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From the Coloradoan.com:

Have wolves traveled into Larimer County, Colorado?

Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials are attempting to confirm a credible wolf sighting in the Laramie River Valley in Larimer County, according to a news release.

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From Colorado State University:

Colorado residents will vote in November on a ballot initiative that calls for the proposed reintroduction of gray wolves to the state. Proposition 107, a citizen-initiated measure, would direct the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission to develop and oversee a science-based plan to restore wolves to the western part of the state.

To help ensure the public is informed on this topic, Colorado State University scientists have teamed up with Extension staff to produce and publish educational materials on the possible wolf restoration.

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From Coloradoan.com:

Now that a pack of wolves has been confirmed in Colorado for the first time in decades, could the state also have its first breeding pair?

Answering that question could have ramifications for a ballot initiative and legislative bill that calls for reintroducing wolves, predators that have been absent from the state since the 1940s (aside from sporadic reports of wandering lone individuals).

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From the High Plains Journal:

Rio Blanco county ag groups raised $34,000 to help oppose the statewide ballot initiative to introduce wolves on the Western Slope of Colorado. The Rio Blanco Stockgrowers Association, in partnership with the Rio Blanco Farm Bureau and Rio Blanco Woolgrowers, hosted “Dance Without Wolves,” a fundraiser dinner, dance and auction to raise money to oppose the proposal.

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