Posts

From The Northern View in British Columbia, Canada:

A recent wolf attack was predatory in nature, said the Conservation Officer Service (COS) about the assault on a Port Edward senior citizen.

“The preliminary findings of the investigation are that the wolf through opportunity began attacking the victim. The attack was predatory in nature,” Tracy Walbauer, Sergeant with the North Coast Zone COS said of the May 29 incident.

Click here for the full story.

From The Narwhal:

Wolves have long been a source of fascination for biologist Kevin Van Tighem, who grew up in southern Alberta in the 1960s and 1970s. He read widely about the exotic creature he had never seen, an animal often hated and feared: depicted in a popular fairy tale as a big-toothed, big-eyed monster whose trickery would soon be rewarded with a pleasant meal.

Van Tighem’s first personal encounter with a wolf — unexpectedly hearing one howl near his home in Banff — helped launch him on a lifelong journey to understand our complicated relationship with the shaggy canid whose ancestors branched off millions of years ago in the tree of evolution, eventually to gift humans with our most loyal companions: dogs.

Click here for the full story.

From The Narwhal in Canada:

Coastal GasLink paid $171,000 to kill wolves in the range of an endangered caribou herd that will lose critical habitat to the company’s pipeline for a gas export project, The Narwhal has learned.

The money for a winter wolf cull in Hart Ranges caribou habitat, northeast of Prince George, was part of $1.5 million the B.C. government required Coastal GasLink to pay for “caribou and predator monitoring” — a condition for receiving a provincial environmental assessment certificate for its 670-kilometre pipeline.

Click here for the full story.

From TheGuardian.com:

When Doug Paton burst from his trailer on a warm spring afternoon, he expected to confront yet another stray dog agitating the livestock on his sister’s farm outside Victoria, a city on Canada’s west coast. Instead, standing barefoot in the grass, he found himself face to face with a wolf.

“It stopped dead in its tracks and it stared me down,” he says. Then, as quickly as it appeared, the wolf trotted away, pausing once to stare back at Paton before clearing a five-foot metal gate and vanishing.

Click here for the full story.

From PrinceGeorgeMatters.com:

As many of us are forced to work from home or are unable to work at all, more and more people are scouring the internet looking for distractions from COVID-19 news.

PrinceGeorgeMatters, as always, has you covered as we explore the question: eagle vs. wolf, who would win?

Click here for the full story.

From The Williams Lake Tribune in British Columbia, Canada:

A total of 94 wolves were removed as part of a predator reduction program to support the recovery of the Itcha-Ilgachuz caribou herd in the West Chilcotin.

This past winter’s wolf removal achieved the target of less than three wolves for every 1,000 square kilometres, which is the target that the federal caribou recovery strategy identified as necessary to achieve a positive response in re-building the caribou population, confirmed a spokesperson for the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development.

Click here for the full story.

From The Williams Lake Tribune in British Columbia, Canada:

The provincial government is moving forward next month with plans to remove about 90 wolves in the Itcha-Ilgachuz mountain ranges in an effort to save the area’s dwindling caribou herd.

Today approximately 385 caribou remain in the area, a decline from 2,800 in 2003, a spokesperson for the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development noted.

Click here for the full story.

From the Times Colonist in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada:

Conservation officers tranquilized a wolf Sunday evening that had been seen roaming in James Bay over the weekend.

Police said the wolf was not harmed and will be taken to a vet to be cleared medically before the B.C. Conservation Officer Service decides the next steps.

Click here for the full story.

From burnabynow.com

The B.C. government wolf management plan involves radio-collaring single wolves and then killing the rest of the pack while leaving the lone wolves alive.

Click here for the full story.

From bclocalnews.com

A wolf cull to protect the Tweedsmuir-Entiako caribou herd, now in the final stages of approval, would kill at least 80 per cent of the wolves in the area through aerial hunting, according to the province.

Click here for the full story.