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From wmicentral.com/

Fuller is a wolf biologist with Arizona Game & Fish, part of the Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team. When the annual wolf count is held in January, one of the tasks she takes on is “helicopter mugger,” the person who helps locate, count and capture wolves from a chopper.

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Form abqjournal.com

RESERVE – U.S. Fish and Wildlife crews fly above the forests of Catron County in a helicopter. A nearby airplane relays the location of a Mexican gray wolf. Fresh snow has made the animals easier to spot from the air.

“Starting pursuit,” the helicopter crew broadcasts over the radio.

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From the White Mountain Independent:

PINETOP — Residents of Alpine, Arizona and Reserve, New Mexico and surrounding areas may notice a low-flying helicopter in the region between Jan. 22 and Feb. 4 as biologists conduct their annual Mexican wolf population survey and capture.

The flights are part of the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, a multi-agency cooperative effort among the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Service Inspection Service – Wildlife Services, and the White Mountain Apache Tribe.

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From The Copper Era:

GREER — The U.S. Forest Service issued a warning to hunters in the White Mountains area of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests this week.

ASNF noted that Mexican wolves are present within the forests and that hunters should be careful what they shoot.

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From the White Mountain Independent:

APACHE COUNTY — The range war between wolves and humans continues in Arizona and New Mexico, according to the latest report from Arizona Game and Fish.

From January to June, eight wolves died or were killed, out of a documented 2018 population of 131; two of the deaths occurred in Arizona.

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From The Copper Era in Safford, Arizona:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — While remaining safe within Arizona, the gray wolf faces the threat of delistment elsewhere in the country by the Department of Interior.

The commenting period for removing the wolf from the Endangered Species Act ended July 15, with officials touting the success of conservation efforts in restoring populations throughout the country.

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From KFDI.com:

A pile of wolf puppies might help boost a critically endangered species.

The Sedgwick County Zoo sent a couple of Mexican wolf pups to Arizona to boost the population size and increase the genetic diversity in that species. The Zoo said there are fewer than 150 of those wolves left in the wild.

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From Drovers.com:

In an effort to limit conflicts between Mexican gray wolves and cattle, funding for a grant program has been established by the Arizona Livestock Board. Ranchers would be eligible to seek funding for employing measures that limit the interactions of cattle and wolves.

The program was unanimously approved by the board during a November meeting, but it was not announced until Jan. 3. The program is aimed at researching preventative measures such as deploying range riders can prevent conflicts.

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From KVOA TV in Tucson, Arizona:

A wolf that once roamed parts of the American Southwest and northern Mexico would be removed from the list of federally protected species under legislation proposed by U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake.
    
The Arizona Republican introduced the measure last week. He’s a critic of the Mexican gray wolf recovery plan, calling it a regulatory nightmare for ranchers and rural communities.

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From The Daily Courier:

Growing up on the F-Bar ranch in Snowflake, I know how important the cattle ranching industry is to Arizona’s economy. I also know ranching is both hard and humbling. Ranchers do not need the federal government making it any more challenging.

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