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From KRBD.com:

Trappers reported taking almost as many wolves as had estimated to live on and around Prince of Wales Island. It’s a new record number of wolves — 165 taken in Unit 2 — which includes Prince of Wales and surrounding islands.

But residents behind the effort say it’s not cause for alarm.

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From OutdoorHub.com:

These gripping photos were taken during a life-or-death battle while a mother moose defends her calf from a pack of hungry wolves.

Although the moose dwarfs the attacking wolves, her efforts may not be enough to keep her young safe.

In this incredible photo sequence, the enormous moose takes a defensive stand against five wolves in a small pond in Alaska as the wolves plot to kill the newborn moose:

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From the Juneau Empire:

It was past midnight one night in August 2018 that the film crew and their Alaskan guides, out shooting for a Netflix documentary series called “Night on Earth,” found themselves sitting in the dark, surrounded by wolves.

They were next to a salmon stream in the Tongass National Forest, wearing night vision goggles and filming with thermal imaging cameras, attempting to capture something that hadn’t yet been previously captured on film: wolves catching salmon at night.

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From Alaska Public Media:

Alaska Governor Mike Dunleavy is shaking up the Department of Fish and Game.

His acting commissioner, Doug Vincent-Lang, has made a pair of unconventional, high-level appointments. Rick Green — the right-wing talk show host known as Rick Rydell — is Vincent-Lang’s new special assistant.

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From CNET.com:

Heavy gray clouds hang low in Alaska’s Denali National Park and Preserve this September morning. There’s an 80 percent chance of rain, but we’ve lucked out with only a light mist so far. I’m walking along the banks of the Teklanika River, which cuts a 90-mile swath through inland Alaska, with Bridget Borg, a wildlife biologist with the National Park Service, and biological assistant Kaija Klauder.  

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